A Travellerspoint blog

Looking around Linz

Austria's third city.

sunny

We left Vienna and headed by train for Linz which is the third-largest city in Austria and the capital of Upper Austria. We have never been here before. I've always heard it described as very industrial, but actually it is a beautiful and relaxing city with plenty to see and do. One of Linz's claims to fame is the Linzer torte, which is said to be the oldest cake in the world. It dates from 1653.

People associated with Linz include: mathematician and astronomer - Johannes Kepler; composer - Anton Bruckner and rather more unfortunately - Adolf Hitler, who moved to Linz when he was a child. Hitler spent most of his youth in the city of Linz. He planned to build a huge new Fuhrermuseum here to display his collection of art, which had been looted from all over Europe.

When we arrived in Linz we walked from the train station to our nearby hotel - the Ibis Linz. We checked in, freshened up then went off to explore the city.

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Linz Train Station.

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The Ibis, Linz.

We began by walking to the Volksgarten - a park with statues and ponds and the Linz Musiktheater. One of the statues was of the Austrian writer Franz Stelzhamer who wrote poems and songs in the dialect of Upper Austria.

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Linz Musiktheater.

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Fountain in the Volksgarten.

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Franz Stelzhamer.

Leaving the Volsgarten we began walking down Landstraße, one of Linz's main streets. We passed a restaurant getting into the world cup spirit. Then we saw the Martin Luther Kirche. When it was originally built, Catholic building rules required that Protestant churches be placed around 50m from the street, so that they were not too prominent.

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Josef Restaurant, Landstraße.

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Martin Luther Kirche.

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Martin Luther Kirche.

Next we left Landstraße,to visit the nearby New Cathedral, also called the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. This is a beautiful building with spectacular stain glass windows. Those that were broken in the Second World War were replaced with new windows in modern designs. This is the biggest cathedral in Austria, but not the tallest as no cathedral in Austria was allowed to be taller than Vienna's Stephansdom.

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The New Cathedral.

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The New Cathedral.

Then we returned to Landstraße and visited two neighbouring churches: the Carmelite Church and the Church of Saint Ursula. The Church of Saint Ursula had a strange art exhibition on.

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The Carmelite Church

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The Church of Saint Ursula.

Next we walked to the sixteenth century Landhaus which is the seat of the Upper Austrian provincial government. There is a statue of Adalbert Stifter, an Austrian writer, poet and painter just outside it.

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The Landhaus

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Adalbert Stifter.

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Impressive building opposite the Landhaus.

From here we walked on to Linz main square, which used to be its market place. It has fountains and a large baroque plague column. Nearby is The Old Cathedral, also known as the Church of Ignatius. It was built between 1669 and 1683 and served as Linz cathedral until 1909. Anton Bruckner was once the organist here, so the Bruckner Festival is held here annually.

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Main Square, Linz.

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Plague column.

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Old cathedral, Linz.

From the main square we walked across an extremely windy bridge over the Danube. We had good views of Linz Castle which is now a museum. In the distance we could see Postlingberg Church perched on its hill. We walked across to the new town hall, then crossed the road to Urfahr Parish Church with a rather strange staircase next to it. Linz has some striking modern buildings such as the Lentos Art Museum and the Ars Electronica Centre.

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Linz Castle.

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Postlingbeg Church.

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New Town Hall.

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Urfahr Parish church Linz.

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The River Danube.

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The Lentos Arts Museum.

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The Danube.

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The Ars Elctronica Centre and Urfahr Parish church

Just past the Lentos Museum on the south bank of the Danube lies the lovely Donau Park with restaurants, fake beaches, greenery and modern sculptures.

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City Beach on the banks of the Danube.

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Donau Park.

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Donau Park

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View across the Danube.

Starting to feel tired and hungry, we walked back to our hotel and had dinner there before a good night's sleep to prepare us for the long journey ahead.

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In Linz Ibis Hotel.

Posted by irenevt 07:17 Archived in Austria Tagged churches danube austria linz hitler bruckner

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Hello again Irene, thanks for your kind plaudits on my Casablanca blog, if I managed to upload full-size photographs it was more by luck than any IT skills, I see from your blog that the TP pictures are in a new format, maybe I will try to write a Fes el Bali blog to "test the water"....at the moment I am still in extended recovery mode after unilateral DCiS surgery, fortunately it was successful, but Kilmarnock Sheriff Court are harassing me to attend for jury duty, but I managed to get my doctor to fire off an email to them confirming my medical condition, so I've been "excused in this instance".......which ominously seems to indicate they will try again, the last thing I need to disturb my resting regime, now that the stitches have finally dissolved, is having to listen to lowlife druggies and prostitutes in the dock, I had enough of that driving Glasgow Corporation buses around Easterhouse, now thankfully just a distant unpleasant memory!

by Bennytheball

Hi Benny,
Wishing you a speedy recovery. \take it easy and try to have a good rest. |'ll e-mail you a bit later. All the best,
Irene

by irenevt

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